Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Harrat Khaybar















Harrat Khaybar, Saudi Arabia lies in the western half of the Arabian peninsula and contains not only large expanses of sand and gravel, but also extensive lava fields known as haraat (harrat for a named field). According to scientists, the volcanic field was formed by eruptions along a long north-south linear vent system over the past 5 million years; the most recent recorded eruption took place between 600-700 A.D.

The presence of tuff cones - formed by eruption of lava in the presence of water together with other volcanic features indicative of water - in the Harrat Khaybar suggest that the local climate was much wetter during some periods of volcanic activity. Today, however, the regional climate is hyperarid - little to no yearly precipitation - leading to an almost total lack of vegetation.

The image was taken by the Expedition 16 crew aboard the Inernational Space Station in March 2008.

Image Credit: NASA

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Comet C/2017 01
















Please click HERE to view the track and location of Comet C/2017 01 in the 3D Solar System Simulator.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Young America in Literature: A Calvinist Assumption

A key theme in American literature is a play on a Calvinist assumption that people, and especially people with power, are up to no damn good. This theme comes to us from the Old Testament and St. Augustine, and from St. Thomas Aquinas on natural theology--though, in respect to Aquinas, the conclusion is essentially Calvinist; by way of example, see Thomas Jefferson in his opening remarks both to the Declaration and to The Virginia Act of Religious Freedom. Technical analyses of the idea can be found in Wittgenstein.  See, for example, On Certainty; though Wittgenstein's many circumspect remarks on the human condition, recorded in Ray Monk's biography and elsewhere, are rather more pertinent to the matter here.

In Moby-Dick, the theme is played out as Ishmael works through his youthful non-involvement, takes responsibility for himself, goes into survival mode, and brings to bear a mature skeptical attitude in an assessment of the people he finds himself with on board the Pequod: what an evil madman Ahab is, what an unaware cypher Mr. Flask is, what a moral coward (at bottom, and ironically) Mr. Stubb is, what a "bureaucratic" conformist Mr. Starbuck is, and what a lot of brutes the crew are... In "Benito Cereno", Melville plays on this theme as Captain Delano naively walks among the slaves who have taken over Cereno's ship, and how, after much narrative suspension, Delano finally figures out what's going on and takes control of the situation... In The Confidence-Man, Melville repeatedly plays on the theme, presenting a series of scenarios where people (with one or two exceptions) fail to see that they are being conned by the devil.

In The Scarlet Letter, it comes in the form of too-slowly identifying various "enemies"-- Chillingworth, the community, its moral foundations, its leadership, its theocratic system--and failing to take appropriate action.

In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, it comes in the form of the various misadventures experienced by Jim and Huck, and concludes with Huck heading out West as the appropriate response to the underlying fraud that riddles society, and so on.

Richard Basehart as Ishmael in Moby-Dick

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Online Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) Simulator
















AGC was the main computer system of the Apollo program that successfully landed 12 astronauts on Moon. There was one AGC on each of the Apollo Command Modules and another one on each Lunar Module. There was also a second backup computer system called Abort Guidance System (AGS) on the Lunar Modules, which is simulated by Virtual AGC, but not the current version of Moonjs.
Astronauts interacted with AGC by using DSKY, a combination of 7-segment numerical displays, indicator lights and a simple keypad,

Please click HERE to enter data and toggle the controls.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Bishop James Pike and Philip K.Dick






















A brief sketch on James Pike (narrated by Leonard Nimoy):


 
Pike is Philip K. Dick's subject in The Transmigration of Timothy Archer, which is not a science fiction novel, but rather an inquiry into the intellectual credulity and psychological weaknesses that led to the destruction of Pike and his family, and which is told against the backdrop of the dynamic social fracturing that characterizes Berkeley in the 1960s. Smart, skeptical, lucid, learned, humorous, philosophically comprehensive, sharply drawn--Dick unequivocally denounces Pike and the "New Age" phantasm into which Pike (and so many) had fallen, and which ultimately led to Pike's death.






 
















The Transmigration of Timothy Archer is not (as the Amazon description states) part of the VALIS Trilogy.

Monday, October 2, 2017

The Philosophy of Composition


In a composition there's always "room" for another part, another chop, another angle, another version, another layer, another interpretation, another expression, another suggestion, another perspective, another scale, another inversion, another translation, another conversion, another voice, another counterpoint, another change, etc.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Terrance Lindall Retrospective and Gala Dinner



The Terrance Lindall Retrospective 1962-2017
December 16, 2017- January 8 2018
Catalog available
Reception December 17th (Subject to change) 4-6 PM admission $10
Followed by “Dinner With the Devil”,
with musical interludes by Peter Dizozza and Bienvenido Bones Banez
A sumptuous dinner plus music and light entertainment, TIX $500

Dinner includes a guided visit to the rare book library and treasure rooms with a look at one of a kind rare treasures including a collection of over 400 17th c. English wax seals including that of King Charles I on a 1635 document regarding land that is now Edinburgh Airport, and a wax seal of Oliver Cromwell on the marriage contract of his daughter. Also, a 17th c. English beheading ax, a magnificent 17th. Torah scroll of the book of Genesis (23 feet long), a magnificent 17th c. French tapestry border depicting Mary, Jesus and John. Plus 17th c. Milton Books, and  afurst edition of Edward Young's Night Thoughts featuring William Blake's illustrations.

Please click HERE for complete information.

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Poem


       The Forbidden Libation

In this shallow and shining pool
Oblong, coffin-regular and warm,
Buoys the duck with constant smile,
In prospect sharing and co-eternal
With the piddling trickle of yonder
Faucet brightly glimmering, a star—
Old Time alone sings such stars,
Angel signs, arch appurtenances—
Coursing in a firmament to mortals unknown
And to poetasters untasted, that sea,
Innocent pool oe’r which Junior first elevates
Then plunges the plastic cup!
Crying an oath, echoed in a splash,
Down thrusts the handled vessel
Whose displacement tosses soapy
Yet potable delight towards wall,
Pale curtain and linoleum floor
(Did Archimedes begin thus?)
Then pulled aloft, brimming full
Of liquid mass proscribed by lore
Scarcely regarded in the impending
Spontaneity of the bather’s next act...
To the lips approaching, suddenly,
With a grimace, a snort, and a wince,
Forbidden resolution, flowing abandon, folly:
Thus sipped! Ha ha ha ha ha ha!
And Mommy, thou shall never know!


Friday, September 29, 2017

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The medium is the message, continued



















Collected, analyzed and packaged, your ideas, opinions and concerns sent to you by a third-party provider...

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Vitasta is reading Emanations

















 
Please click HERE to learn more about Emanations: I Am Not a Number.
 
Please click HERE to learn more about Vitasta Raina's novella, Writer's Block.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Allegory of Political-Ontological Invasion and Spiritual Erosion

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is certainly one of Philip K. Dick's best novels. Here is a Palmer Eldritch digital painting by artist Sally Marsh.






















Another image inspired by this frightening novel can be viewed HERE.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Man and Superman

None of the dogmas of modern science are immutable. Gigantic factories, office buildings rising to the sky, inhuman cities, industrial morals, faith in mass production, are not indispensable to civilization. Other modes of existence and of thought are possible. Culture without comfort, beauty without luxury, machines without enslaving factories, science without the worship of matter, would restore to man his intelligence, his moral sense, his virility, and lead him to the summit of his development.

                                       – Alexis Carrel

Saturday, September 23, 2017

History of Japanese Woodblock Prints

By period and artist, please click HERE.

Katsukawa Shuncho, "No. 5, from the series
Twelve Months in Six Sheets 

(Jûni kô rokumai tsuzuki)", 1789-95

Friday, September 22, 2017

Formae Luminis





















Soon as the force of that fallacious Fruit,
That with exhilerating vapour bland
About thir spirits had plaid, and inmost powers
Made erre, was now exhal'd, and grosser sleep
Bred of unkindly fumes, with conscious dreams
Encumberd, now had left them, up they rose
As from unrest, and each the other viewing,
Soon found thir Eyes how op'nd, and thir minds
How dark'nd; innocence, that as a veile
Had shadow'd them from knowing ill, was gon,
Just confidence, and native righteousness
And honour from about them, naked left
To guiltie shame hee
cover'd, but his Robe
Uncover'd more, so rose the Danite strong
Herculean Samson from the Harlot-lap
Of Philistean Dalilah, and wak'd
Shorn of his strength…

         --John Milton, Paradise Lost, 9.1046-1062

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017

The Whispering Moirai

"When silence is prolonged over a certain period of time, it takes on new meaning."                        
                                                               — Yukio Mishima

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Jolly Roger Symbols






















Please click HERE for an article on submarines flying the Jolly Roger.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cassini, final images and archive

As we all know, yesterday the Cassini spacecraft plunged into the clouds of Saturn, ending its twenty year mission (launched 1997, inserted into orbit 2004).

The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has published the final images of Cassini's descent into Saturn's atmosphere, as well as an archive of Cassini images.  Please click HERE.

Cassini's final image.  JPL.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Virginia Woolf on the Meaning of Life















What is the meaning of life? That was all--a simple question; one that tended to close in on one with years, the great revelation had never come. The great revelation perhaps never did come. Instead, there were little daily miracles, illuminations, matches struck unexpectedly in the dark; here was one.
                               ― Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Conversations with Philip K. Dick by Tessa B. Dick

I just received a copy of Ms. Dick's new book. An excerpt was published in Emanations: I Am Not a Number, and I have been looking forward to the appearance of this book since.  Please click HERE to view the Amazon description.


Saturday, September 2, 2017

Emanations: I Am Not a Number reviewed

Emanations: I Am Not a Number has received a favorable review on Amazon-Canada.  Please click HERE.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Brian Aldiss

British author Brian Aldiss passed away last Saturday.

At 10:00 p.m. last Monday BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight done featured a short piece on Mr. Aldiss, and includes an interview with Michael Moorcock talking about him. It's the final piece in the program. Please click HERE. It begins at 39:15.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Conversations with Philip K. Dick

Emanations: I am Not a Number readers are familiar with extracts from Tessa B. Dick's new book about her late husband, Philip K. Dick, which is now available on Amazon.  Considering the insightful and prophetic novels of Philip K. Dick, and the contemporary scientific, social, and political political developments which he foresaw, this is a significant volume.

To view the Amazon page for Conversations with Philip K. Dick, please click HERE.


Friday, August 18, 2017

Apropos

Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.

                                             --George Orwell, 1984

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Friday, August 11, 2017

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Light, Geometric Planes, Attendant Emotions

Lyonel Feininger, Sunset at Deep (Sunset), 1930, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

"Whatever Happened to Bishop Pike?"

Dr Martin Luther King at Grace Cathedral with Bishop James Pike and Reverend George L Bedford

















Worth a few minutes.  Please click HERE.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Peter Dizozza Live at the Sidewalk Cafe

In anticipation of the publication of Terrance Lindall's Milton in Outer Space,  Peter Dizozza and Terrance Lindall have composed a musical number. Please click HERE for a sample of Mr. Dizzoza premiering the piece on July 26 at the Sidewalk Cafe in New York.

Peter Dizozza


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Aapparatus for for purging carbon dioxide from Lunar Module, Apollo 13


















Interior view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) showing the "mail box," a jury-rigged arrangement which the Apollo 13 astronauts built to use the Command Module (CM) lithium hydroxide canisters to purge carbon dioxide from the LM. Lithium hydroxide is used to scrub CO2 from the spacecraft's atmosphere. Since there was a limited amount of lithium hydroxide in the LM, this arrangement was rigged up to utilize the canisters from the CM. The "mail box" was designed and tested on the ground at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) before it was suggested to the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crew men. Because of the explosion of one of the oxygen tanks in the Service Module (SM), the three crew men had to use the LM as a "lifeboat".
Source 

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Andrew Darlington on Michael Butterworth

UK writer Andrew Darlington has fiction appearing in a number of Emanations anthologies, including the latest, Emanations: I Am Not a Number.

He maintains a blog and has recently posted a lengthy interview/essay/bibliography on Michael Butterworth, who is a member of the International Authors editorial board.  Please click HERE to view the piece.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Recommendation: Kristine Shmenco

Poet and fiction writer Kristine Shmenco has been associated with International authors for some time. In fact, she was part of International Authors before it became International Authors--which as a "community" traces back perhaps fifteen years (but more on that story later)...  Meanwhile, in addition to contributing to the Emanations anthology, she helped staff the International Authors table at the Brooklyn Book festival in 2013.  She also joined us in Manhattan for a meeting of International Authors in 2015

She posts a steady stream of intriguing short fiction to her blog, Indigo Vales.  Please click HERE to view her latest work.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Kabul















Female students at the Polytechnical University in Kabul, Afghanistan, mid-1970s.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Edward Drinker Cope



















On December 29, 1906, a meeting was held in the American Museum of Natural History to present an installation of ten marble busts commemorating “Pioneers of American Science”. The personal character, the contributions and the significance of each scientist was the subject of an address given by a presenter, of which there were ten.  Here is the text of the address commemorating Edward Drinker Cope delivered by Dr. Henry Fairfield Osborn, Curator, Department of Vertebrate Palæontology:
In the marble portrait of Edward Drinker Cope, you see the man of large brain, of keen eye and of strong resolve, the ideal combination for a life of science, the man who scorns obstacles, who while battling with the present looks above and beyond. The portrait stands in its niche as a tribute to a great leader and founder of American Palæontology, as an inspiration to young Americans. In unison with the other portraits its forcible words are: “Go thou and do likewise.
Cope, a Philadelphian, born July 28, 1840, passed away at the early age of fifty-seven. Favored by heredity, through distinguished ancestry of Pennsylvania Quakers, who bequeathed intellectual keenness and a constructive spirit. As a boy of eight entering a life of travel and observation, and with rare precocity giving promise of the finest qualities of his manhood. Of incessant activity of mind and body, tireless as an explorer, early discovering for himself that the greatest pleasure and stimulus of life is to penetrate the unknown in Nature. In personal character fearless, independent, venturesome, militant, far less of a Quaker in disposition than his Teutonic fellow citizen Leidy. Of enormous productiveness, as an editor conducting the American Naturalist for nineteen years, as a writer leaving a shelf-full of twenty octavo and three great quarto volumes of original research.  A man of fortitude, bearing material reverses with good cheer, because he lived in the world of ideas and to the very last moment of his life drew constant refreshment from the mysterious regions of the unexplored.
In every one of the five great lines of research into which he ventured, he reached the mountain peaks where exploration and discovery guided by imagination and happy inspiration gave his work a leadership. His studies among fishes alone would give him a chief rank among zoölogists, on amphibians and reptiles there never has been a naturalist who has published so many papers, while from 1868 until 1897, the year of his death, he was a tireless student and explorer of the mammals. Among animals of all these classes his generalizations marked new epochs. While far from infallible, his ideas acted as fertilizers on the minds of other men. As a palæontologist, enjoying with Leidy and Marsh the Arcadian period when all the wonders of our great West were new, from his elevation of knowledge which enabled him to survey the whole field with keen eye he swooped down like an eagle upon the most important point.
In breadth, depth and range we see in Cope the very antithesis of the modern specialist, the last exponent of the race of the Buffon, Cuvier, Owen and Huxley type. Of ability, memory and courage sufficient to grasp the whole field of natural history, as comparative anatomist he ranks with Cuvier and Owen; as palæontologist with Owen, Marsh and Leidy—the other two founders of American palæontology; as natural philosopher less logical but more constructive than Huxley. America will produce men of as great, perhaps greater genius, but Cope represents a type which is now extinct and never will be seen again.
















Source:  The American Museum Journal, Vol. VII, No. 2, February, 1907, p. 25-26.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

The Medium is the Message















Today many people are active on the internet and communicating globally. If our technology was still limited to shortwave communications, I doubt so many would feel the need to broadcast themselves around the world.  Perhaps the key factor here is the preference for written over verbal communications?  Compare the preference people have to "text" rather than speak over their telephones.

For a quick glance at the contemporary world of shortwave radio communications, please click HERE.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Q.E.D.






















The Amazon description is similarly convincing.  Please click HERE.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Pendant






















Venus and Cupid astride a fanciful fish.  Gold, enamel, rubies and pearls.  Italian or German, ca. 1580?